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My Normative Communication Styles and Values

The purpose of My Normative Communication Styles and Values chart is to identify arenas of difference between ethnic groups that can destroy trust and respect when the differences are unknown to one or both parties in a communication. These unknown or invisible differences in communication style and values also create difficulties because they may be presumed to be individual personality or ethical issues. By identifying your own style, you can then "see" differences that may have been hidden between yourself and someone with another ethnic background.


What is your communication style? Check the boxes to summarize your own communication style when working with someone in a work setting. Then compare your communication style with the normative communication style of someone with a different ethnic background. Go to Normative Communication Styles to see different patterns from your own. Where are the biggest differences? Do you have a strategy to bridge those differences?

Summary
Normative Communication Styles & Values
For Cross-Cultural Collaboration

Communication Style
(Review of Literature)

Very little

Little

Medium

Much

Very Much

Animation/Emotional Expression

.

.

.

 

.

Gestures

.

 

.

.

.

Range of Pitch between words

.

.

.

 

.

Volume of speech

.

.

.

.

.

Directness of questions

.

.

   

., .

Directness of answers

.

.

   

., .

Directness of rhetorical style, "getting to the point"

.

.

   

., .

Accusations require a direct response

.

.

.

.

 

Directness of eye contact

.

.

.

.

.

Firm, long handshaking

.

 

.

.

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Touching

.

 

.

 

.

Concern with clock time

.

.

 

.

.

Hierarchical membership in group

.

.

   

.

Individualism more than lineal identity

.

.

     

Individualism more than collateral group identity

.

.

.

 

.

Awareness of unearned "white" privilege

.

     

.

Closeness when standing

.

.

.

 

.

*. American, . American, . or European American, . American, . American or Latino

 

 

Communication Style
(Focus Groups)

Very little

Little

Medium

Much

Very Much

Task-Based Purpose vs. Relationship

.

.

   

.

Written vs. verbal

.

   

.

.

Long term history between groups is important

.

     

.

Perceived right to set rules and agenda for meeting

.

.

   

.

Perceived right to speak freely at meeting

.

.

   

.

Authority of the person more important than the logic

.

 

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.

Formal dress

 

.

   

.

Perceived right to represent or speak for the group

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.

.

   

.

Collaboration based on authority

.

.

     

.

Self-Identity, how one describes oneself, related to skin color or ethnicity

.

   

.

.

Ignoring "turns"

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.

 

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.

Self-promotion

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.

 

.

.

Use first names vs. titles (Mr., Ms., Reverend)

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Spiritual elements included in meetings

.

.

   

.

Defer to older persons in group

.

 

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Speed of Response

.

 

.

 

.

Collaborators must have community respect and support

.

     

.



Next Chapter
Ten Myths That Prevent Collaboration Across Cultures

First Chapter
Executive Summary and List of Chapters

Candia Elliott, Diversity Training Associates
R. Jerry Adams, Ph.D., Evaluation and Development Institute
Suganya Sockalingam, Ph.D Office of Multicultural Health, Department of Human Resources, Oregon
September 1, 2010

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