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Solar Eclipse

Papers
  1. -Observing the Sun and Solar Eclipses (Solar Center)
      Provides methods to safely "observe" the sun. Never look directly at the sun or view the sun through binoculars. Never look at the sun through a telescope without specially designed filters. Viewing the sun directly or through lenses can cause permanent damage to your eyes, even blindness. 3-02

  2. Longest Solar Eclipse of the Century (MSNBC News)
      "Hordes of scientists, students and nature enthusiasts prepared Tuesday for the longest total solar eclipse of this century, while millions planned to shutter themselves indoors, giving in to superstitious myths about the phenomenon."

      "Wednesday's eclipse will first be sighted at dawn in India's Gulf of Khambhat, just north of the metropolis of Mumbai, before being seen in a broad swath moving north and east to Nepal, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Bhutan and China." 07-09

  3. Longest Solar Eclipse of the Century (MSNBC News)
      "Hordes of scientists, students and nature enthusiasts prepared Tuesday for the longest total solar eclipse of this century, while millions planned to shutter themselves indoors, giving in to superstitious myths about the phenomenon."

      "Wednesday's eclipse will first be sighted at dawn in India's Gulf of Khambhat, just north of the metropolis of Mumbai, before being seen in a broad swath moving north and east to Nepal, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Bhutan and China." 07-09

  4. Photographing a Solar Eclipse (ABC News)
      "Most of the picture-perfect images you'll see from this celestial phenomenon will be taken with professional digital cameras on tripods or shot through a telescope. These images typically aren't single photographs, but rather composites of multiple photos using various exposures that are digitally combined for a stunning result." 08-17

  5. Photographs of 2017 Solar Eclipse (ABC News)
      Provides pictures. 08-17

  6. Pictures of Venus and the Sun (Time.com)
      "For nearly all of human history, there was only one way to observe a cosmic event: with your eyes. This was a bad thing if the event occurred on a cloudy day, and an even worse thing if it wasn’t cloudy but the event was a solar eclipse, which could wind up being, well, the last thing you’d ever see."

      "A lot has changed, and that fact was spectacularly in evidence this week, as Venus made one of its very rare transits of the sun—an event that won’t come again for 105 years. All over the world, skywatchers had telescopes and cameras pointed sunward as the black speck of Venus glided slowly across the solar disk. But 22,000 mi. (36,000 km) above the Earth, another set of eyes was watching the event. Those eyes belong to the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), whose designers know a thing or two about looking at the sun." 06-12

  7. Safety Tips for Viewing a Solar Eclipse (NationalForests.org)
      "The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as 'eclipse glasses' or handheld solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun."

      "Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device. Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury. Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device." 08-17

  8. Solar Eclipse (Time.com)
      "The rare annular solar eclipse will be visible on the west coast of North America and in parts of Asia on May 20 and 21." 05-12

  9. Solar Eclipses and Advancement of Science (Time.com)
      "Astronomers have been studying solar eclipses for centuries. In the late 16th and early 17th centuries, Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe and his apprentice German astronomer Johannes Kepler studied eclipses to try to arrive at a rough estimate of the moon's diameter." 08-17

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