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Terms: switzerland
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  1. Switzerland National Library (in Switzer Deutsch)
      Provides are directory in German. 10-09

  2. Switzerland

  3. Switzerland (LonelyPlanet.com)

  4. Switzerland Joins the United Nations (CBS News)
      "After nearly two centuries of neutrality, Switzerland became the 190th member of the United Nations on Tuesday with the unanimous support of the General Assembly." 9-02

  5. Number 20: ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), Switzerland (TopUniversities.com)
      "U.S.News & World Report's World's Best Universities rankings, based on the Times Higher Education-QS World University Rankings, identified these to be world's top universities in 2009." ETH Zurich was ranked number 20.

  6. Rulers by Country - S-U (Schulz)
      Provides a list of leaders by country and date. Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Sáo Tomé and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka (Ceylon), Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand (Siam), Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekhistan. leaders, rulers, Presidents, and Prime Ministers 9-00

  7. 02-08-04 U.S. May Have Found Saddam's Money (Guardian Unlimited)
      "The United States believes it has found at least $300 million Saddam Hussein hid in banks, yet doesn't have enough evidence to get countries such as Syria and Switzerland to hand over the money, U.S. and European officials told The Associated Press."

      "Much to the frustration of the Bush administration, countries that acted quickly on relatively weak evidence involving al-Qaida funds have been unwilling to do the same on Iraq, partly because of growing doubts about the quality of U.S. intelligence."

      "Were the account held in a U.S. bank, federal authorities wouldn't need any more evidence than they already have because the Patriot Act, passed after Sept. 11, 2001, gives them expanded powers of search and seizure." 2-04

  8. Arafat, Yasser - Biography (NobelPrize.org)
      "Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat As Qudwa al-Hussaeini was born on 24 August 1929 in Cairo**, his father a textile merchant who was a Palestinian with some Egyptian ancestry, his mother from an old Palestinian family in Jerusalem."

      In a speech at a special United Nations session held in Geneva, Switzerland, Arafat declared that the PLO renounced terrorism and supported 'the right of all parties concerned in the Middle East conflict to live in peace and security, including the state of Palestine, Israel and other neighbours.' "

      The prospects for a peace agreement with Israel now brightened. After a setback when the PLO supported Iraq in the Persian Gulf War of 1991, the peace process began in earnest, leading to the Oslo Accords of 1993."

      "This agreement included provision for the Palestinian elections which took place in early 1996, and Arafat was elected President of the Palestine Authority." Arafat won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work with Israel and the United States toward peace in the Middle East. 1-05

  9. Living Wage (Wikipedia.org)
      Points out that a living wage is different from the minimum wage. "The term 'living wage' is used by advocates to refer to the minimum hourly wage necessary for a person to achieve some specific standard of living. In the context of developed countries such as the United Kingdom or Switzerland, this standard generally means that a person working forty hours a week, with no additional income, should be able to afford a specified quality or quantity of housing, food, utilities, transport, health care, and recreation. This concept differs from the minimum wage in that the latter is set by law and may fail to meet the requirements of a living wage." 11-06

  10. Large Hadron Collider (Wikipedia.org)
      "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a particle accelerator and collider located at CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland.... Currently under construction, the LHC is scheduled to begin operation (at reduced energies) in November 2007. The LHC is expected to become the world's largest and highest energy particle accelerator in 2008, when commissioning at 7 TeV is completed. The LHC is being funded and built in collaboration with over two thousand physicists from 34 countries, universities and laboratories." 03-07

  11. Dinosaur Mass Grave Found (CNN.com)
      "An amateur paleontologist in Switzerland may have unearthed Europe's largest dinosaur mass grave after he dug up the remains of two Plateosaurus."

  12. Amish (Wikipedia.org)
      "They are often best known for their simple living, plain dress and their resistance to the adoption of many modern conveniences. The history of the Amish church began with a schism in Switzerland within a group of Swiss and Southern German Mennonites, in 1693."

  13. Amish History (Religious Tolerance.org)
      "he beliefs and practices of the Amish were based on the writings of the founder of the Mennonite faith, Menno Simons (1496-1561), and on the 1632 Mennonite Dordrecht Confession of Faith. The Amish who split from Mennonites generally lived in Switzerland and in the southern Rhine river region. During the late 17th century, they separated because of what they perceived as a lack of discipline among the Mennonites."

  14. World's Happiest Places (ABC News)
      "According to a new report released by the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), a Paris-based group of 30 countries with democratic governments that provides economic and social statistics and data, happiness levels are highest in northern European countries."

      "Denmark, Finland and the Netherlands rated at the top of the list, ranking first, second and third, respectively. Outside Europe, New Zealand and Canada landed at Nos. 8 and 6, respectively. The U.S. did not crack the top 10. Switzerland placed seventh and Belgium placed tenth." 05-09

  15. 2009 Tour de France, Stage by Stage (New York Times)
      "The 96th Tour de France, which will run from July 4 to 26, will be contested over 2,174 miles. It begins with a time trial in Monaco and runs through France, with visits to Spain and Switzerland. It is a grueling test of endurance and strategy. Follow the New York Times's coverage of the race on this map, updated during the Tour with articles, photos and multimedia." 07-09

  16. -Zurich Tries to Cut Energy Use Drastically (CBS News)
      "Zurich, Switzerland's largest city, has a radical goal: to reduce the amount of energy residents use by two-thirds and become a 2,000-watt society."

      "If you take all the energy being consumed on earth and divide by the number of people it works out to about 2,000 watts per person, every second of every day. That's roughly the energy it takes to keep 20, 100-watt light bulbs burning. But how many of us are using more than our share?"

      "Top of the list are Americans who use 12,000 watts each. Europeans use about half that much - 6,000 watts on average. Africans and Bangladeshis use less than 700." 12-09

  17. Editorial: Time Investigates Scientology in 1991 (Time.com)
      "To explore Scientology's reach, TIME conducted more than 150 interviews and reviewed hundreds of court records and internal Scientology documents. Church officials refused to be interviewed. The investigation paints a picture of a depraved yet thriving enterprise. Most cults fail to outlast their founder, but Scientology has prospered since Hubbard's death in 1986. In a court filing, one of the cult's many entities — the Church of Spiritual Technology — listed $503 million in income just for 1987. High-level defectors say the parent organization has squirreled away an estimated $400 million in bank accounts in Liechtenstein, Switzerland and Cyprus. Scientology probably has about 50,000 active members, far fewer than the 8 million the group claims. But in one sense, that inflated figure rings true: millions of people have been affected in one way or another by Hubbard's bizarre creation." 03-10

  18. -02-28-11 Clinton: "No Option Is Off the Table" on Libya (CBS News)
      "After a day of discussions with European allies in Switzerland, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Monday that 'no option is off the table' for dealing with Libyan leader Muammar al Qaddafi." 02-11

  19. Scientists Look for the "God Particle" (CBS News)
      " The Large Hadron Collider sits 300 feet below the surface of the Earth on the rural France-Switzerland border, spinning and smashing particles at near-light speed, costing many billions of dollars, and consuming countless hours of some of the best scientific minds in the world, mostly to answer one important question: What, exactly, is matter?" 05-11

  20. -12-13-11 The Search for the "God Particle" Narrows (Time.com)
      "The existence of mass — the property of matter that gives gravity something to pull on — needs explaining."

      "Now, say two independent teams of scientists who revealed their results at a symposium in Switzerland Tuesday morning, there are experimental signs of an elusive particle formally known as the Higgs boson — and informally known as the 'God particle.' If the Higgs is really there, the existence of mass has finally been explained, and a Scottish physicist named Peter Higgs is a lock for the Nobel prize."

      "Suffice it to say that there's a sort of energy field that pervades the universe, and that when particles like protons, neutrons, quarks and the rest interact with the Higgs field, they're rewarded with mass. The Higgs boson helps broker the transaction." 12-11

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