Awesome Library Search   
   

Search Results

Terms: ethiopia
Matches: 26    Displayed: 19


Categories

Specific Results

  1. Ethiopian Languages

  2. Ethiopia (Dinar)

  3. Ethiopia (Library of Congress)
      IRIN provides a history of conflict of the neighboring countries that once were allies. 6-00

  4. History of the Ethiopia-Eritrea Conflict (Denden.com)
      Provides an Eritrean perspective to the history of conflict and breaking news stories. 6-00

  5. Ethiopia (CountryReports.org)
      Provides a profile by topic, including Economy, Defense, Geography, Government, People, National Anthem, Lyrics and Related Links. Provides a map and a flag. 6-02

  6. Ethiopia

  7. Rulers by Country - D-F (Schulz)
      Provides a list of leaders by country and date. Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji Islands, Finland, and France. leaders, rulers, Presidents, and Prime Ministers 9-00

  8. Mountains of the World (Wenzel)
      Provides pictures and information on mountains that allow exploration by walking, including Kilimanjaro (Tanzania), Mount Ararat (Turkey), Mont Blanc (France), Ras Dashen (Ethiopia), Mount Kinabalu (Sabah), Mount Cameroon (Cameroon), Mount Fuji (Japan), Pico de Teide (Canary Islands, Spain), Mount Etna (Italy), Qornat es-Sawda (Lebanon), Musala (Bulgaria), Jabal Katrina (Egypt), Huayna Picchu (Peru), Pico (Azores, Portugal), Hekla (Iceland), Ben Nevis (Scotland), Snowdon (Wales), Scafell Pike (England), Bénara (Mayotte), and Christoffelberg (Curaçao). 7-01

  9. Oldest Homo Sapiens Humans Found (TalkOrigins.org)
      "Some new fossils from Herto in Ethiopia, are the oldest known modern human fossils, at 160,000 yrs. The discoverers have assigned them to a new subspecies, Homo sapiens idaltu, and say that they are anatomically and chronologically intermediate between older archaic humans and more recent fully modern humans. Their age and anatomy is cited as strong evidence for the emergence of modern humans from Africa, and against the multiregional theory which argues that modern humans evolved in many places around the world." 06-03

  10. New Ocean Forming in Africa (CBS News)
      "Ethiopian, American and European researchers have observed a fissure in a desert in the remote northeast that could be the 'birth of a new ocean basin,' scientists said." 01-06

  11. Homo Sapiens Idaltu (Wikipedia.org)
      "Homo sapiens idaltu (roughly translated as "elderly wise man") is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens that lived almost 160,000 years ago in Pleistocene Africa. Its fossilized remains were discovered in Ethiopia in 1997 by Tim White, but first unveiled in 2003. The fossils were found at Herto Bouri, a region of Ethiopia under volcanic layers. By using radioisotopes dating, the layers date between 154,000 and 160,000 years old. Three well preserved craniums are accounted for, the best preserved is from an adult male (BOU-VP-16/1) having a brain capacity of 1450cc."

      Provides a chart of hominids, including humans, at the bottom of the page. 03-06

  12. Oldest Homo Sapiens Found (BBC News)
      "Three fossilised skulls unearthed in Ethiopia are said by scientists to be among the most important discoveries ever made in the search for the origin of humans."

      "The crania of two adults and a child, all dated to be around 160,000 years old, were pulled out of sediments near a village called Herto in the Afar region in the east of the country."

      " 'All the genetics have pointed to a geologically recent origin for humans in Africa - and now we have the fossils,' said Professor Tim White, one of the co-leaders on the research team that found the skulls." The Herto fossils have been classified as Homo sapiens idaltu, now extinct. Homo sapiens sapiens is the only subspecies of Homo sapiens known to have survived as current humans. 03-06

  13. -04-29-06 Worst Draught in 20 Years Hits East Africa (ABC News)
      "The Horn of Africa is facing its worst drought in two decades, and nearly 6 million people in Ethiopia, Somalia, Djibouti and Kenya are at risk of dying. In recent days the much-anticipated seasonal rains have arrived in some parts of the region, but it's not nearly enough and in many places the sudden rains have led to flash flooding." 04-06

  14. -08-11-08 Why Africa Is Still Starving (Time.com)
      "Over time, sustained food aid creates dependence on handouts and shifts focus away from improving agricultural practices to increase local food supplies. Ethiopia exemplifies the consequences of giving a starving man a fish instead of teaching him to catch his own. This year the U.S. will give more than $800 million to Ethiopia: $460 million for food, $350 million for HIV/AIDS treatment — and just $7 million for agricultural development. Western governments are loath to halt programs that create a market for their farm surpluses, but for countries receiving their charity, long-term food aid can become addictive. Why bother with development when shortfalls are met by aid? Ethiopian farmers can't compete with free food, so they stop trying." 08-08

  15. -02-01-12 Editorial: The Global Crisis of Stunting (Time.com)
      "Stunting, or stunted growth, is the result of chronic nutritional deficiencies. A stunted 5-year-old is four to six inches shorter than a non-stunted peer. But lost height is the least of concerns: a stunted child, for instance, is nearly five times more likely to die from diarrhea than a non-stunted child because of the physiological changes in a stunted body. Stunting is also associated with impaired brain development. A typical stunted brain has fewer cells. The cells themselves are somewhat smaller, and the interconnection between them is more limited. This means lasting impaired functioning, which leads in turn to significantly reduced learning. Considering the severe effects, stunting has received far too little attention for far too long."

      "Stunting is so common in some areas that it is sometimes mistaken for a genetic heritage, rather than a preventable condition. Just 21 countries straddling the globe account for more than 80% of the problem around the globe. In six countries — Afghanistan, Burundi, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Timor-Leste and Yemen — 50% or more of all children under age 5 suffer from this condition. In Afghanistan, a staggering 59% of children under age 5 are stunted."

      "How can a community, a nation or a continent ever hope to develop to its full capacity if its children cannot? In all conscience, how can those of us in societies not so afflicted withhold our help to combat stunting in the developing world? We know how to address the problem by providing expectant mothers, newborns and very young children nutrients such as proteins, fat and vitamins and minerals such as vitamin A, iron and zinc." 02-12

  16. Africa - East African News (AllAfrica.com)
      Provides news directly from each country in Eastern Africa, including Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda.

  17. Africa - Travel Information by Location (Excite.Travel.com)
      Provides information on dining, where to stay, and interesting things to see. Search by city, state, or country. Includes Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros and Mayotte, Cote d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Republic of Congo, Reunion, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. 3-02

  18. AIDS Projections for 2010 in Just Four Countries (BBC News)
      Shows how many cases of AIDS are predicted by 2010 in Russia, China, Nigeria, and Ethiopia if effective prevention is not in place soon. 12-03

  19. -11-01-06 Dad Found Guilty of Mutilation (CBS)
      "An Ethiopian immigrant who was convicted Wednesday of the genital mutilation of his 2-year-old daughter was sentenced to 10 years in prison in what was believed to be the first such criminal case in the United States." 11-06

Back to Top

Home Teachers Students Parents Librarians College Students
Send comments to [Dr. Jerry Adams at jadams@awesomelibrary.org.]