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  1. Messier Catalog of Objects in the Night Sky (NCats.net)
      Provides a list and description (including small picture) of objects visible in the night sky with a small amateur telescope. 7-02

  2. -Editorial - Terrorists Require the Partnership of Mass Media (Christian Science Monitor - Felling)
      "Troubling questions abound: Does terrorism exist without the media? Does coverage of terrorist acts empower or encourage the people behind them? If terrorism is directed more at the audience than at its victims, shouldn't television journalists stop giving terrorists the forum they covet?"

      "Certainly, television news covers terrorist attacks for the high-minded journalistic objective of informing viewers. But the zeal with which fear has been commoditized - from shark attacks to child kidnappings to the Washington sniper - is a product of TV executives realizing that frightened people put down the remote control and await news updates, ratcheting up ratings points. Unfortunately, this living-room fearmongering plays right into the hands of terrorists who are attempting to rattle every American, turning television news reporters into de facto publicists for terrorists."

      "Nearly 20 years ago, the eminent Washington reporter David Broder suggested that 'the essential ingredient of any effective antiterrorist policy must be the denial to the terrorist of access to mass media outlets.' He said this in a different era, before 24-hour news channels were in hot competition for Americans' attention. He's still right."

      "Amateur cooks learn quickly that pouring water on a grease fire only makes it worse. Broadcasters must realize that their coverage might be doing the same. Like cutting off the oxygen that sustains a flame, a few internal shifts in reporting policy would traumatize viewers less and could save lives." 9-04

  3. Computer-Security Experts Warn of Stolen Elections (MSNBC News)
      "The best minds in the computer-security world contend that the voting terminals can’t be trusted. Listen, for example, to Avi Rubin, a computer-security expert and professor at Johns Hopkins University who was slipped a copy of Diebold’s source code earlier this year. After he and his students examined it, he concluded that the protections against fraud and tampering were strictly amateur hour."

      "(The biggest buzz focuses on the 2002 Georgia gubernatorial election, won by a Republican underdog whose win confounded pollsters.) Suspicions run even higher when people learn that some of those in charge of voting technology are themselves partisan. Walden O’Dell, the CEO of Diebold, is a major fund-raiser for the Bush re-election campaign who recently wrote to contributors that he was 'committed to helping Ohio deliver its electoral votes for the president next year.' "

      "To remedy the problem, technologists and allies are rallying around a scheme called verifiable voting. This supplements electronic voting systems with a print-out that affirms the voter’s choices. The printout goes immediately into a secure lockbox. If there’s a need for a recount, the paper ballots are tallied." 11-04

  4. Braddock, James J. (CyberBoxingZone.com)
      "Braddock was an outstanding amateur and power-punching middleweight whose fragile hands derailed his career."

      Editor's Note - The depiction of Braddock's opponent, Max Baer, in the movie Cinderella Man was partly fictional." 6-05

  5. Holmes, Larry (Britannica.com)
      " Holmes won 19 of 23 amateur bouts before turning professional. From 1973 to 1978 Holmes won 28 consecutive bouts, culminating in a victory over the reigning champion, Ken Norton. He defended the title 17 times between 1978 and 1983, once (1980) against Muhammad Ali. He lost the title to Michael Spinks in 1985. Only Joe Louis held the heavyweight crown longer than Holmes." 6-05

  6. Michelle Wie Loses Bid for the Masters (Fox News)
      "Michelle Wie's (search) dream of making the Masters ended relatively early. Clay Ogden (search) birdied four of the first five holes and never came close to losing his lead, handing the 15-year-old high school junior a 5-and-4 loss Friday in the quarterfinals of the U.S. Amateur Public Links."

  7. Ancient Roman Coins Reveal History (Archaeology.org - Benenson)
      "During the chaos and confusion of the third century A.D., amid widespread disease, famine, and barbarian invasions, a brazen upstart seizes control of a breakaway state within the Roman Empire. He proclaims himself emperor only to disappear days later, his life and story lost, save for only the briefest of remarks in two fragmentary and unreliable sources. Then, an amateur treasure hunter scanning the green fields of Oxfordshire with a metal detector chances upon a small clay pot filled with more than 5,000 ancient Roman coins." 04-06

  8. -11-09-06 The 2006 Elections Were Under Intense Citizen Scrutiny (Christian Science Monitor)
      "Intense scrutiny of the process has helped poll workers stay on their toes, say experts."

      "This year, a new initiative called 'Video the Vote' enlisted amateurs to film poll irregularities. The idea: to bring attention to voting problems even in elections where the winning margin was large enough that they would normally receive little attention.

      'There's so much focus on calling the winners and losers ... that we lose sight of whether the voter was a winner or loser,' says Ian Inaba, one of the leaders of the project that has posted hundreds of interviews at videothevote.org. 'You look at those lines in Denver and Missouri or listen to some of those voters in Maryland or even New Jersey - things were not OK [Tuesday]. There were a lot of frustrated people.' " 11-06

  9. -11-17-06 Students "Patrolling the Police" With Videocameras (MSNBC News)
      "Alleging racial profiling, a UCLA student intends to sue after a campus police officer shot him with a Taser stun gun. The incident was caught on a cell phone camera, the third time in a week that police behavior in the Los Angeles area was criticized after amateur video surfaced." 11-06

  10. -04-21-07 Jessica Long Wins Sullivan Award (USASwimming.org)
      "Jessica Long, a U.S. Paralympic swimmer, was honored this week in New York as the recipient of the 77th AAU Sullivan Award, which is presented to the USA’s top amateur athlete. Long is the first Paralympic athlete ever to win this award." 07-06

  11. Dinosaur Mass Grave Found (CNN.com)
      "An amateur paleontologist in Switzerland may have unearthed Europe's largest dinosaur mass grave after he dug up the remains of two Plateosaurus."

  12. Evans, Janet (Wikipedia.org)
      "In 1987, she broke the world records in the 400-, 800- and 1,500-meter freestyle events. At the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, she won three gold medals. In the games, she set a new world record in the 400-meter freestyle event; this record would hold for 18 years until Laure Manaudou broke it in May 2006. Until June 2007 Evans held the 1,500 meters record (set in March of 1988) when it was broken by Kate Ziegler with a time of 15:42.54. Evans holds the current world record in the 800 meters (set in August of 1989). The 800 record is one of the longest standing ever in the sport of swimming, lasting through four Olympic Games. Only the 100 m freestyle record of the dutch swimmer Willy den Ouden stood longer (1936 - 1956)."

      "Janet Evans was named the 1989 recipient of the James E. Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete in the United States."

      "Following her 1988 performance, Evans continued to dominate the American and world distance scene. She became the first woman ever to win back-to-back Olympic and World Championship titles in any event, taking the 1988 and 1992 Olympic titles and the 1991 and 1994 World titles in the 800 m freestyle."

      "She won the 400 m and 800 m free at the U.S. National Championships 12 times each, the most national titles in one event by any swimmer in the 100-year history of the event. 08-07

  13. -10-11-08 Editorial: What Does Palin's Abuse of Power Mean? (Time.com)
      "In the [investigative] report [regarding Gov. Sarah Palin's possible abuse of power], the head of Gov. Palin's security detail says that Todd [Palin] spent about half of his time in the governor's office — not at a desk (he didn't have one), but at a long conference table on one side of the office, with his own phone to make and receive calls. It became a shadow office, the informal Department of Getting Mike Wooten Fired." Mike Wooten was Gov. Palin's brother-in-law.

      "But even though she won't likely face any legal repercussions, the amateurism and cronyism of her brief administration hardly leaves Palin sitting pretty. Troopergate's final verdict may be even more damaging than a rebuke: her administration was, at least this regard, just as self-motivated as the Washington fat cats and lobbyists she hopes to unseat." 10-08

  14. Super Bowl XLIII Winning Ads (USA Today)
      "It wasn't just the Arizona Cardinals who met their match in the Super Bowl — so did Madison Avenue. And it could be a game-changer. For the first time, it wasn't an ad agency that created the best-liked Super Bowl commercial. It was two unemployed brothers from Batesville, Ind., whose ad for Doritos — created for an online contest for amateurs — won them $1 million from Doritos maker Frito-Lay, and leaves ad pros with a lot of 'splaining to do." 02-09

  15. Stock Photos (Flickr.com)
      Provides amateur and professional photos. 03-09

  16. 03-16-11 Video of Japanese Tsunami (New York Times)
      Provides an amateur video. 03-11

  17. Do Prosthetic Legs Provide an Advantage? (RunnersWorld.com)
      "In January, an independent study found that the prosthetic limbs used by Oscar Pistorius, a double below-the-knee amputee, give him an unfair advantage over runners with two whole legs, thus violating an International Amateur Athletics Federation rule that prohibits the use of technical aids. As a result, the IAAF banned the South African 400-meter specialist from competing in IAAF-sanctioned events--including the 2008 Olympic Summer Games in Beijing, China." 08-12

  18. What Happens When the Sea Rises? (NationalGeographic.com)
      "In 1985 one captain brought Mol a beautifully preserved human jawbone, complete with worn molars. With his friend, fellow amateur Jan Glimmerveen, Mol had the bone radiocarbon-dated. It turned out to be 9,500 years old, meaning the individual lived during the Mesolithic period, which in northern Europe began at the end of the last ice age some 12,000 years ago and lasted until the advent of farming 6,000 years later. 'We think it comes from a burial,' says Glimmerveen. 'One that has lain undisturbed since that world vanished beneath the waves, about 8,000 years ago.' "

      "The story of that vanished land begins with the waning of the ice. Eighteen thousand years ago, the seas around northern Europe were some 400 feet lower than today. Britain was not an island but the uninhabited northwest corner of Europe, and between it and the rest of the continent stretched frozen tundra. As the world warmed and the ice receded, deer, aurochs, and wild boar headed northward and westward. The hunters followed. Coming off the uplands of what is now continental Europe, they found themselves in a vast, low-lying plain."

      "Archaeologists call that vanished plain Doggerland, after the North Sea sandbank and occasional shipping hazard Dogger Bank." 12-12

  19. Do Crabs Feel Pain? (Time.com)
      "Do lobsters, crabs and other crustaceans feel pain? We certainly act as if they don’t, cramming them in tanks with their claws wired shut, tossing them as if they were a football. And then there’s the cooking itself—most chefs, professional and amateur, cook lobsters and crabs alive, usually by dumping them in boiling water." 01-13

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