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Terms: Celiac Disease
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  1. -01 Breakthrough in Understanding Disease (New York Times)
      "The findings, which are the fruit of an immense federal project involving 440 scientists from 32 laboratories around the world, will have immediate applications for understanding how alterations in the non-gene parts of DNA contribute to human diseases, which may in turn lead to new drugs. They can also help explain how the environment can affect disease risk. In the case of identical twins, small changes in environmental exposure can slightly alter gene switches, with the result that one twin gets a disease and the other does not."

      "As scientists delved into the 'junk' — parts of the DNA that are not actual genes containing instructions for proteins — they discovered a complex system that controls genes. At least 80 percent of this DNA is active and needed. The result of the work is an annotated road map of much of this DNA, noting what it is doing and how. It includes the system of switches that, acting like dimmer switches for lights, control which genes are used in a cell and when they are used, and determine, for instance, whether a cell becomes a liver cell or a neuron."

      "In one of the Nature papers, researchers link the gene switches to a range of human diseases — multiple sclerosis, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease — and even to traits like height. In large studies over the past decade, scientists found that minor changes in human DNA sequences increase the risk that a person will get those diseases. But those changes were in the junk, now often referred to as the dark matter — they were not changes in genes — and their significance was not clear. The new analysis reveals that a great many of those changes alter gene switches and are highly significant."

      " 'Most of the changes that affect disease don’t lie in the genes themselves; they lie in the switches,' said Michael Snyder, a Stanford University researcher for the project, called Encode, for Encyclopedia of DNA Elements." 09-12

  2. -05-05-09 The Gluten-Free Lifestyle (ABC News)
      "In her new book, "The G-Free Diet: A Gluten Survival Guide," Hasselbeck tells her personal story and tells you how you can start living a gluten-free life."

      "I learned about gluten the hard way. I wrote this book so you don't have to. Most people with celiac disease, like me, have a story to tell. My hope is that in reading mine, and the pages that follow, you will be able to begin your journey to a better body and a better self—without all the heartache (and bellyache!) that I endured for far too long." 05-09

  3. Editorial: Modern Wheat a Poison (CBS News)
      "Modern wheat is a 'perfect, chronic poison,' according to Dr. William Davis, a cardiologist who has published a book all about the world's most popular grain."

      "Davis said that the wheat we eat these days isn't the wheat your grandma had: 'It's an 18-inch tall plant created by genetic research in the '60s and '70s,' he said on 'CBS This Morning.' This thing has many new features nobody told you about, such as there's a new protein in this thing called gliadin. It's not gluten. I'm not addressing people with gluten sensitivities and celiac disease. I'm talking about everybody else because everybody else is susceptible to the gliadin protein that is an opiate. This thing binds into the opiate receptors in your brain and in most people stimulates appetite, such that we consume 440 more calories per day, 365 days per year." 09-12

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