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History

Papers
  1. Ancient Vikings Found in London (CNN News)
      "On Friday, officials revealed that analysis of the men's teeth shows they were Vikings, executed with sharp blows to the head around a thousand years ago. They were killed during the Dark Ages, when Vikings frequently invaded the region." 03-10

  2. Anglo-Saxon Private Law (Albert H. Putney)
      "It was not a bad life being English in 1066 on the eve of the Norman Conquest; it was the kind of life that many modern people vainly envy. For the most part, it was lived in little villages, and it was almost completely self-sufficient and self-supporting: the only things most villages had to buy or barter were salt and iron." 11-08

  3. Battle of Hastings (Battle1066.com)
      Describes the history leading up to the Battle of Hastings, as well as describing what happened after it. 2-05

  4. Battle of Hastings (BritainExpress.com)
      "When Edward the Confessor died he left no direct heir, and the throne of England passed to Harold. However, William of Normandy claimed that Edward had promised the crown to him, and indeed that Harold himself had sworn a sacred oath to relinquish his claim in William's favour." 2-05

  5. Battle of Hastings (HistoryLearningSite.co.uk)
      Describes the history leading up to the Battle of Hastings, as well as describing what happened after it. 2-05

  6. Domesday Book (HistoryLearningSite.co.uk)
      "The Domesday Book is one of Medieval England's greatest treasures. The Domesday Book is closely linked with William the Conqueror's attempt to dominate Medieval England. Along with a string of castles throughout England, the Domesday Book was to give William huge authority in England." 2-05

  7. From the Norman Conquest to the Magna Carta (St Edmundsbury Borough Council)
      Provides a history from 1066 to the Magna Carta. 11-08

  8. History of Real Estate Law in England (Duhaime.org)
      "It was not a bad life being English in 1066 on the eve of the Norman Conquest; it was the kind of life that many modern people vainly envy. For the most part, it was lived in little villages, and it was almost completely self-sufficient and self-supporting: the only things most villages had to buy or barter were salt and iron." 11-08

  9. Norman Castles (HistoryLearningSite.co.uk)
      "The Normans were master castle builders. After 1066, England witnessed a massive castle building programme on the orders of William the Conqueror. First, motte and bailey castles were built. Once William had firmly established his rule in England, he built huge stone keep castles. By the time of Edward I, concentric castles were being built." 2-05

  10. Stonehenge Had Unique Acoustics (MSNBC News)
      "Stonehenge was built as a dance arena for prehistoric "samba-style" raves, according to a study of the acoustics of the 5,000-year-old stone circle."

      "Watson's research strongly suggested that the monument's builders knew how to direct the movement of sound. Indeed, the stones at Stonehenge amplify higher-frequency sounds, such as the human voice, while lower-frequency sounds such as drums pass around the stones and can be heard for some distance."

      "The effect would have been a 'dynamic multisensory experiences,' according to Watson." 01-09

  11. Stonehenge for Healing? (Tlegraph.co.uk)
      "Now Timothy Darvill, professor of archaeology at Bournemouth University, has breathed new life into the controversy with the publication of a book which proposes that the monument was in fact a centre of healing. Prof Darvill also backs the recent view that modern-day druids and hippies who celebrate the summer solstice at the site in the belief that they are continuing an ancient tradition should in fact carry out their rituals in December." 01-07

  12. What Happens When the Sea Rises? (NationalGeographic.com)
      "In 1985 one captain brought Mol a beautifully preserved human jawbone, complete with worn molars. With his friend, fellow amateur Jan Glimmerveen, Mol had the bone radiocarbon-dated. It turned out to be 9,500 years old, meaning the individual lived during the Mesolithic period, which in northern Europe began at the end of the last ice age some 12,000 years ago and lasted until the advent of farming 6,000 years later. 'We think it comes from a burial,' says Glimmerveen. 'One that has lain undisturbed since that world vanished beneath the waves, about 8,000 years ago.' "

      "The story of that vanished land begins with the waning of the ice. Eighteen thousand years ago, the seas around northern Europe were some 400 feet lower than today. Britain was not an island but the uninhabited northwest corner of Europe, and between it and the rest of the continent stretched frozen tundra. As the world warmed and the ice receded, deer, aurochs, and wild boar headed northward and westward. The hunters followed. Coming off the uplands of what is now continental Europe, they found themselves in a vast, low-lying plain."

      "Archaeologists call that vanished plain Doggerland, after the North Sea sandbank and occasional shipping hazard Dogger Bank." 12-12

  13. William the Conqueror (BBC News)
      "After successfully invading England, William the Conqueror changed the course of English history." 2-05

  14. William the Conqueror (HistoryLearningSite.co.uk)
      "William the Conqueror should strictly be known as William I. William is credited with kick-starting England into the phase known as Medieval England. William was the victor at the Battle of Hastings, he introduced modern castle building techniques into Medieval England and by his death in 1087, he had financially tied down many people with the Domesday Book." 2-05

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