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2005


News
  1. -07-25-05 Japan Plans World's Fastest Computer (Fox News)
      "The American Blue Gene/L system supercomputer developed by International Business Machine Corp. at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, currently holds the title of the world's fastest. That machine is capable of 136.8 teraflops, or 136.8 trillion calculations per second, according to Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology."

      "Japan wants to develop a supercomputer that can operate at 10 petaflops, or 10 quadrillion calculations per second, which is 73 times faster than the Blue Gene, an official of the ministry said on condition of anonymity." 7-05  

  2. -09-10-05 Energy from Backpack to Replace Batteries (ScienceDaily.com)
      "If you already have a little spring in your step, a team of biologists at the University of Pennsylvania would like to put it to good use by adding a few more springs in the form of a power-generating backpack. Details of their prototype "Suspended-load Backpack" were announced today in the journal Science. The device converts mechanical energy from walking into electricity up to 7.4 Watts more than enough energy to power a number of portable electronic devices at once." 9-05

  3. Electrified Clothes (CNN News)
      "A new generation of 'soft' electrical devices has been made possible by a fabric with built-in touch sensor technology."

      "The innovative material, known as ElekTex, could be used to incorporate phones or music players into clothes, remote controls into sofas, or light switches into walls or carpets." 3-05

  4. New Fuel Cell Technology for Phones (ABC News)
      "On Wednesday, New York-based Medis Technologies will demonstrate what it claims is the first commercial portable fuel cell, solving many of the problems that have plagued developers over the past few years." 3-05

Papers
  1. Athletic Ability Tests (MSNCNET.com)
      "Sports Potential, in Palo Alto, Calif., has developed a series of tests and sophisticated software to calculate an individual's aptitude for a wide range of sports--from baseball to bobsledding. After a two-hour test, the company's Web-based software can illustrate a subject's physical traits, such as body composition, power, speed, agility and endurance, and compare the results with people in the same age group."

  2. Bio-Fuels From Genetics (MSN.com)
      "J. Craig Venter, who gained worldwide fame in 2000 when he mapped the human genetic code, is behind a new start-up called Synthetic Genomics, which plans to create new types of organisms that, ideally, would produce hydrogen, secrete nonpolluting heating oil or be able to break down greenhouse gases." 11-05

  3. Editorial: How Apple May Save Blockbuster Video (PBC.org - Cringely)
      "Poor Blockbuster Video hasn't made a profit in years, the stock is down about 90 percent from its 2002 high, NetFlix is cleaning its clock, and nobody - I mean NOBODY - thinks the future looks in any way rosy for this pioneering video rental chain. Steve Jobs to the rescue? Maybe."

      "Apple's Blockbuster product strategy is simple. Start with a new iPod that has video- and audio-out capability. This iPod -- which will be just as good at playing songs as any iPod that preceded it - will be more than just a video storage device. It will be a video player. No make that plural - players - a whole family of video-out iPods, some with flash storage and others with little disk drives."

      "Take your Video-out iPod to Blockbuster, drop it in a kiosk dock then download from the local xServe your choice of 50,000 movies. You can rent the movie or buy it and you can even choose the resolution, which may or may not affect the final price. Take the iPod home, drop it in the dock attached to your TV and watch the movie. H.264 decoding takes place in the iPod in hardware." 03-06

  4. Science's Best Leaders (CBS News)
      "Embryonic stem cell researcher Woo Suk Hwang and the founders of Google, Inc., are among the 50 people named by Scientific American as having made the greatest contributions to science and technology in 2005." 11-05

  5. Whose Internet Is It? (International Herald Tribune)
      "Some foreign governments are uncomfortable with the United States' controlling the nuts and bolts of the Internet. That is understandable. So much of the success of the global economy depends on its smooth functioning and the United States has not been a model of receptiveness to other nations' concerns in recent years. There may be a multilateral solution down the road, but right now it is in everyone's best interest to keep control of the Internet where it was founded, in America." 10-05

   
   


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