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Vitamin D

News
  1. Millions of Children Lacking in Vitamin D (MSNBC News)
      "Millions of U.S. children have disturbingly low Vitamin D levels, possibly increasing their risk for bone problems, heart disease, diabetes and other ailments, according to two new studies that provide the first national assessment of the crucial nutrient in young Americans."

      "About 9 percent of those ages 1 through 21 — about 7.6 million children, adolescents and young adults — have Vitamin D levels so low they could be considered deficient, while an additional 61 percent — 50.8 million — have higher levels, but still low enough to be insufficient, according to the analysis of federal data being released Monday." 07-09

Papers
  1. -Meta-Study on Vitamin D (Time.com)
      "The government-backed group looked at 19 clinical trials and 28 observational studies and found that vitamin D, in combination with calcium, can indeed help reduce bone fractures, but that as far as cancer and heart disease are concerned, the data just aren’t conclusive enough to suggest that vitamin D supplements have any benefit."

      "The USPSTF’s review follows a similar review in 2009, conducted by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). That review, which examined the link between vitamin D and 17 health outcomes, culminated in concrete recommendations for how much vitamin D people should get — 600 IUs daily for most Americans." 12-11

  2. -Vitamin D: How to Get Enough Vitamin D (ABC News)
      "The recommended intake for children is 400 IU which translates into about 15 minutes of sunlight 3 times a week. Eating foods such as milk and cheese are also good sources of the vitamin, and if that's not enough, vitamin D supplements are also an option." 07-09

  3. -Vitamin D: Millions of Children Lacking in Vitamin D (MSNBC News)
      "Millions of U.S. children have disturbingly low Vitamin D levels, possibly increasing their risk for bone problems, heart disease, diabetes and other ailments, according to two new studies that provide the first national assessment of the crucial nutrient in young Americans."

      "About 9 percent of those ages 1 through 21 — about 7.6 million children, adolescents and young adults — have Vitamin D levels so low they could be considered deficient, while an additional 61 percent — 50.8 million — have higher levels, but still low enough to be insufficient, according to the analysis of federal data being released Monday." 07-09

  4. Diet: Colas Result in Loss of Bone Density in Women (ABC News)
      "Women who drank more cola had reduced bone mineral density at all three hip sites but not at the spine. The link between cola consumption and women's bone loss was unaffected by age, menopausal status, cigarettes, alcohol, or total calcium and vitamin D intake.

      "Cola consumption did not affect men in the same way. Also, other carbonated drinks were not associated with bone loss." 10-06

  5. Study: Risk of Hip Fractures Reduced With Supplements (ABC News)
      "Taking calcium and vitamin D supplements for several years can help older women reduce the risk of hip fractures, according to the results of a long-term, comprehensive, federally funded study by the Women's Health Initiative."

  6. Three Steps to Reduce Bone Loss (US News)
      Provides three steps to help reduce bone loss: optimize calcium intake, incorporate vitamin D in the diet, and exercise. 02-08

  7. Vitamin D Lowers Risk of Death (Time.com)
      "Doctors have long known that vitamin D is essential to good health. Get enough of it and it ensures strong bones and teeth. But a new study this week suggests an even more extraordinary benefit: a lower risk of death." 09-07

  8. Vitamin D: You May Have a Serious Vitamin D Deficiency (New York Times)
      "Studies indicate that the effects of a vitamin D deficiency include an elevated risk of developing (and dying from) cancers of the colon, breast and prostate; high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease; osteoarthritis; and immune-system abnormalities that can result in infections and autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis, Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis."

      "Most people in the modern world have lifestyles that prevent them from acquiring the levels of vitamin D that evolution intended us to have." 07-10

  9. What We Know About Vitamin D Requirements (New York Times)
      "In any event, unless you are a year-round sun worshiper, a daily supplement of calcium with D, or even a separate supplement of 1,000 units of D, is likely to keep you well below the institute’s upper safe limit. Based on current evidence, unless you have a severe deficiency requiring temporary megadoses to correct, there is no reason to go any higher."

      "At the same time, you’d be wise to get sufficient weight-bearing exercise and avoid several bone-robbing habits: smoking; eating a lot of salty foods; drinking more than two alcoholic drinks a day; consuming more than the caffeine equivalent of two cups of coffee a day (about 300 milligrams); and eating too little protein. As for soft drinks, Dr. Siris advises a daily limit of two 12-ounce cans, and she’d prefer that soda be only an occasional treat."

  10. You May Have a Serious Vitamin D Deficiency (New York Times)
      "Studies indicate that the effects of a vitamin D deficiency include an elevated risk of developing (and dying from) cancers of the colon, breast and prostate; high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease; osteoarthritis; and immune-system abnormalities that can result in infections and autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis, Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis."

      "Most people in the modern world have lifestyles that prevent them from acquiring the levels of vitamin D that evolution intended us to have." 07-10

   
   


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